Technology Trends

Public View

Health Technology Trends is a monthly newsletter featuring unbiased original reporting that keeps you up-to-date on the latest developments in healthcare technology. And it only takes minutes to read.

Our independent reporting features interviews with hospital leaders and helps you get a better handle on navigating today's value-based care climate, whether you're an administrator, planner, CEO, consultant, manufacturer, or government official.

This service is available as part of our Health Technology Assessment Information Service.

 Sample Health Technology Trends

 

 

Study Identifies Six Distinguishing Attributes of High-Value Primary Carehttps://www.ecri.org/components/HRCAlerts/Pages/HRCAlerts112217_Six.aspxStudy Identifies Six Distinguishing Attributes of High-Value Primary Care11/22/2017 12:00:00 AM ​Providers who deliver high-quality, low-cost care often possess one or more of six attributes, according to a study published in the November/December 2017 issue of Annals of Family Medicine.
What if Excessive EHR Requirements Were Treated as Seriously as Healthcare-Acquired Infections or Readmissions?https://www.ecri.org/components/HRCAlerts/Pages/HRCAlerts112217_EHR.aspxWhat if Excessive EHR Requirements Were Treated as Seriously as Healthcare-Acquired Infections or Readmissions?11/22/2017 12:00:00 AM ​Will we one day look back on physicians being overworked by the electronic health record (EHR) in the same way we currently look at physicians neglecting to wash to their hands? That's a question posed by an MD and associate professor of medicine writing in the November 14, 2017, New York Times.
What Is Behavioral Economics and What Role Will It Play in the Future of Healthcare?https://www.ecri.org/components/HRCAlerts/Pages/HRCAlerts111517_Behavioral.aspxWhat Is Behavioral Economics and What Role Will It Play in the Future of Healthcare?11/15/2017 12:00:00 AM ​Work in the field of behavioral economics recently earned one of its leading theorists a Nobel Prize, but its use in healthcare is limited, according to a November 6, 2017, article in the New York Times.